Welcome to the EpicWeb.dev Workshop app!

This is the deployed version. Run locally for full experience.

Unit Testing

Loading "Intro to Unit Test"
Sometimes you have complicated utility functions that necessitate their own test. This could be due to a few reasons:
  • It's really complex and has many edge cases
  • It's widely used and would therefore be disastrous if it broke
Let's take a password validation function as an example:
export function validatePassword(password: string): boolean {
	if (password.length < 8) {
		return false
	}

	if (!/[A-Z]/.test(password)) {
		return false
	}

	if (!/[a-z]/.test(password)) {
		return false
	}

	if (!/[0-9]/.test(password)) {
		return false
	}

	return true
}
We could definitely bring up the login form to test every edge case here, but it would be more efficient to write smaller tests that focus on the validatePassword function itself. For example:
import { test, expect } from 'vitest'
import { validatePassword } from './validatePassword'

test('returns false for passwords shorter than 8 characters', () => {
	expect(validatePassword('1234567')).toBe(false)
})

test('returns false for passwords without uppercase letters', () => {
	expect(validatePassword('12345678')).toBe(false)
})

test('returns false for passwords without lowercase letters', () => {
	expect(validatePassword('12345678')).toBe(false)
})

test('returns false for passwords without numbers', () => {
	expect(validatePassword('abcdefgh')).toBe(false)
})

test('returns true for valid passwords', () => {
	expect(validatePassword('12345678Aa')).toBe(true)
})
The neat thing about this is that the tests will run much faster because they don't each have to spawn an entire browser and load our app. And the lower level testing tools also typically have a more powerful watch mode. Speaking of lower level testing tools...

Mocking

Testing pure functions (functions that don't have side effects) is often much more straightforward. But if you have a really complex bit of logic that can't be reasonably broken down into smaller functions, you can still test at this lower level by mocking the functions and modules it uses.
There are different kinds of mocks. You can mock functions, modules, browser APIs, and fetch requests. We're going to cover mocking functions in this exercise.

Vitest

Vitest is a testing framework modeled (forked) after the popular Jest testing framework. Both are terrific testing tools. We're using Vitest in the Epic Stack because it has better ESM support.
The above example is a Vitest test and should be fairly familiar for anyone who has written a test in JavaScript in the last half decade or more. I suggest you keep ๐Ÿ“œ the Vitest API docs open in a tab for reference as you work through the exercises.
It's useful to know that vitest will run your test files in separate processes so they can be run in parallel by default. This can present problems in some cases, but they're the good kind of problems that help us keep our tests isolated anyway. We'll deal with that later.

Watch mode

Vitest's command line interface (a "CLI" is the thing you run in the terminal) has a cool watch mode that will automatically re-run your tests when you save your files.

Remix

One of the neat things about Remix actions and loaders is that they accept a standard request object and return a standard response object (though in some cases they throw a response object). However, they are not typically "pure" functions because they often perform fetch requests or communicate with a database. So mocking HTTP requests or establishing a test database is often necessary (we'll do that later).